Manual Vacuum Aspiration

Manual Vacuum Aspiration

This type of procedure is best for women who are between five and twelve weeks pregnant.

Manual vacuum aspiration usually takes between five and ten minutes. It can be done using local anesthetic and a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), such as ibuprofen. The doctor will insert a speculum into the vagina and apply a numbing medication to the vagina and cervix. Then, the doctor will pass a thin tube through the cervix and into the uterus. A handheld syringe is attached and used to suction the tissue out of the uterus. As the uterine tissue is removed, the uterus will contract; most women feel cramping during the procedure. The cramps will lessen once the tube is removed. Some women also have nausea, sweating, or feel faint. You should rest after the procedure and resume regular activities the next day.

After the procedure you will experience irregular bleeding or spotting for the first two weeks. You may also have cramps similar to menstrual cramps, which may be present for several hours and possibly for a few days, as the uterus shrinks back to its normal size.

First-trimester surgical abortions are safe and effective and have few complications. Infection is less likely to develop after an aspiration procedure than any other type of surgical abortion. The total risk of complications udring and following a first trimester abortion is about 2-3%.